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Part 3 in a 25 Part Series: Maryann's Favorite Christmas Things

12.04.2012

The treeeeeeeeee!

This year's tree is unlike any other tree I've ever had.  It's not real.  It's not from the Boy Scout troop I like to buy from.  It didn't spend the year growing so I could take it into my home and decorate it.  It isn't full of spiders and sap. When I touch it, my hands don't smell amazing for hours afterwards.  But last year's real Christmas tree caused me so much hassle and heartache, I knew that as long as I lived in an apartment, I would want a fake Christmas tree.

Fortunately my mom and I found a really great one.  It's from Target, and I love it.  The cats love it so much I think they'll be depressed for a week after it goes into storage.  It's taller than any real tree I've ever had, which is great for growing my ornament collection.  I looooove Christmas ornaments.  Who doesn't?

So there's my first Strong Belief About Christmas Trees: they should always be real (ideally a noble fir), but there are exceptions in which a fake one is acceptable.  How do you know if you're an exception?  If, like me, you left last year's tree on your deck until July because it was too big and heavy to drag out to your building's yard bins by yourself.  That's just an example.

Here's my second Strong Belief About Christmas Trees: multi-colored lights.  If I'm in Anthropologie or some crazy rich person's home that has 8 trees, I can enjoy a white lights tree as much as the next person.  But in my home, IN MY HOME, multi-colored lights are required.  An absolute must.  To me, white lights are pretty and wintery and fancy, but if I don't have the full color spectrum on my Christmas tree, I feel like I live in a shopping mall.  My family always had colored lights growing up, and now it's the only way I can dress a tree.

Strong Belief About Christmas Trees #3: no themes.  I mean it!  If all the ornaments are related or match in some way, I will set a flame to that tree.  I really will.  Mine, I mean, not someone else's.  I want ornaments that look like they were curated over 100 years, ranging in price from $30 a piece to 50 cents.  I want ornaments that are handmade, ornaments from other countries, ornaments that look like they were purchased at a corner drugstore, ornaments that are unique and varied.

Strong Belief About Christmas Trees #4: There must be a tree skirt.  I used an old tablecloth for years, but now I finally bought a real, legit skirt.

To the tree!  Bear in mind, some of these photos will feature things on the tree that other photos do not.  Between when I put it up Thanksgiving weekend and last night, I've added more and more stuff to it.  That's why.

Here is an instagram photo I took of it:


AHHHHH SO GLORIOUS

And here are legit camera photos:



You're my soul, and my heart's inspiration...





Look at those tips!  They look real!  THEY LOOK REAL.

Ornament close-up collage, GO:


And the tree skirt! I think it's Scandinavian. I loooove Scandinavian Christmas EVERYTHING.  I found the skirt on Ebay for a steal.  It's used and smells like a barn, but the cats and I love it.  I forgot to take a photo of it before I stuck it under the tree (I was too excited) but it looks the same all the way around, so here it is in sections:


Ahhhh I love it so much.  Mushrooms!  Melting Candles!  Poinsettias!

And Holly's request for info on the star:



Where's it from? Fred Meyer's! And they have them this year too! My friend Kristen had it first, and then I bought one for myself.

And do the kitties love the tree?  Oh yes.


O Tannenbaum!


2 comments:

Courtney said...

Totally with you on the ornament thing! I have a collection of ornaments that span my entire life and all look completely different. Exactly as it should be, as far as I'm concerned.

Maryann said...

Yes, yes, yes! Glad to have a fellow eclectic ornament collector among my friends. I feel like we're rare these days!